Literary Blog Hop: January 6-9

Literary Blog Hop

The Literary Blog Hop is organised by The Blue Book Case. It’s a weekly event for blogs that discuss primarily literary fiction and classics. Hop over the The Blue Book Case if you want to join in!

This week’s discussion question is:
How did you find your way to reading literary fiction and nonfiction?

My answer:
Quite naturally. In my library, under-12s could only borrow from the children’s section, the over-12s from the adult section. At 12, I had finished the whole children’s section (at least, as far as books that appealed to me were concerned) and it was great to “graduate” to the adult section.

I was rather indiscriminately taking out books that seemed nice. I remember getting romancy-type books by e.g., Victoria Holt as well as Dutch contemporary literary writers (Hermans, Vestdijk) and the classics (Stendhal,  Dostoyevsky).

I was not distracted by YA books with beautiful covers, because they didn’t exist at the time. There were children’s books and there were adult books, that was all.

I think I read and liked them all. Food for the young brain! Junk food and three-star food is all fine at that age.

Literary fiction I read this week:

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler, which is a brilliant book!

Competition:

We are so familiar with front covers of books, but now try and guess which back cover this is!

About Leeswammes
I'm owner and editor at bookhelpline.com. In my free time, I read and review books on my two blogs, Leeswammes' Blog and De Boekblogger.

11 Responses to Literary Blog Hop: January 6-9

  1. I was privileged as a child because my grandfather was a booklover and had a house full of books. There I could find all Agatha Christies, Simenons, but also Russian classics and lots of Dutch authors like Vestdijk, Aster Berkhof, Hugo Claus, Felix Timmermans, Gerard Walschap and lots of others. That’s why I have so many books now, I’ve got them from him when he passed away, because I was the only one in the family who was interested in books and reading.

  2. Alley says:

    I didn’t realize some libraries actually restricted which books you could take out based on age. I’ve heard great things about Butler’s Kindred. I should try to check it out!

    • leeswammes says:

      We’re talking way back, Alley! I don’t think there are age restrictions now, at least not in the library where we go now. I sometimes borrow books for myself on my son’s card when I forget my own.

      You should definitely check out Kindred!

  3. diana mack says:

    there wasn’t ya when i was growing up either but at least my library didn’t have restrictions…i remember in grade school we’d find a sydney sheldon book, mark all the “good” parts and pass it around!
    i literally forced my book club to read kindred…now some members are reading her entire backlog! great great book

  4. Leslie says:

    My library kept the pre-teens in the children’s section too. By the time I was 10 I had read everything worth reading in the kids section. I remember my mom telling the librarian that it was ok to pick out some “clean” mysteries like Agatha Christie for me to read.

    I’ve been meaning to read Kindred for years. I chose it as one of the books for the Time Travel Challenge so this year I will finally read it.

    • leeswammes says:

      Kindred is a great book Leslie. It’s time travel but not really science fiction. Just a really nice (or not really nice, actually) that takes place mainly in the past, but seen through the eyes of a modern woman.

  5. Our librarian was restrictive, too. She would only let us children check out from the children’s section. My mom had to sneak Gone With the Wind from the grownup section out for me.

    Here is my post for the Blog Hop.

  6. Melody says:

    In my library growing up, the children’s section was completely separate from the adult section, and I came to view it as a safehaven…and the adult section remained the unknown scary section. I think because my parents didn’t read much, I didn’t have any point of reference for how adult reading looked, and it took me a little longer to figure it out for myself.

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