A Literary Blog Hop and a Readathon

I’m excited to announce two events in April, neither of which I organize, but both of which will be great fun!


Some people (but not nearly enough!) have asked my about the Literary Giveaway Blog Hop. Normally, there would have been one in February, but since the number of participants seems to dwindle, I decided to skip this time, and maybe have the next blog hop in June, as usual.

blog-hop

But no worries, there is going to be a Literary Blog Hop, just not mine. My Book Self is running a Literary Blog Hop from April 3rd to 12th. It’s a great substitute.

So, if you were waiting anxiously for the blog hop, sign up for this one!


On other exciting news, there is the 24 Hour Readathon in April!

Have you ever taken part in this great event? It’s a real happening with lots of mini-challenges, social media events, and well, if you can find the time, some reading!

Dewey

 

April 25th is the date! Hope to see you there…I’m definitely taking part.

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

itsmonday“It’s Monday! What are you reading?” is a weekly event hosted by Sheila at Bookjourney to share with others what we’ve read the past week and are planning to read next.

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My reading week

Weerwater by Renate DorresteinMan o man by Mascha de GroofThe Ship by Antonia HoneywellPublish Successfully on Amazon by Liesbeth Heenk& Sons by David GilbertThe Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber

I finished reading a Dutch dystopian book, Weerwater [Water Fort] by Renate Dorrestein. I love it 4.5 stars. I also finished Man o man [Man, Oh Man] by Mascha de Groof, another Dutch book, a chicklit that lost a few points along the way and ended with 3 stars.

I’m reading The Ship by Antonia Howell and a Dutch book on how to publish on Amazon by Liesbeth Heenk.

I’ve changed my mind about what I’ll be reading next. It’s going to be &Sons by David Gilbert, for our next real-life book group, and a Netgalley download, The Book of Strange New Things by Michel Faber. Those are two very, very big books and should keep me happy for a few weeks!

 

Reviews

Funny Girl by Nick HornbyKoud-Zuid by Ariane Meijer

Funny Girl by Nick Hornby. A very good read!

Koud-Zuid [Cold South] by Ariane Meijer. A thrilling read – in Dutch.

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My challenges

FitReaders2015

#Fitreaders is a challenge for all readers (and everyone else, really) who want to get more active. Last week, I did quite well on average. I had two days of over 10,000 steps and one of 7,000. The other days were a little less.   My goal is 3 x 7,000  and 3 x 5,000 per week, and one day off. So, this is not bad.

Cut-Out-Processed-Food

The Cut out Processed Food in 14 Weeks challenge was easy last week (the seventh week of the challenge): Eat wholemeal everything. That went well! The kids loved the wholegrain rice and prefer it now over the white variant. They also ate the wholewheat biscuits/cookies rather than the left-over non-wholewheat chocolate ones. Very happy with that. This coming week we have to stop eating when we’re full and not eat if we’re not hungry. That’s one of those ha ha, yeah, if only, kind of challenges for me. But I’ll try. Honestly, I will!

 

What are YOU reading this week?

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Book review: Funny Girl by Nick Hornby

Funny Girl by Nick HornbyFunny Girl: What it is about

From the publishers: “Funny Girl is the story of a popular 1960s tv comedy series. The writers, Tony and Bill, comedy obsessives, who each harbour a secret. The Oxbridge-educated director, Dennis, who loves his job but hates his marriage. The male star Clive, who feels he’s destined for better things. And most of all Sophie Straw, once Barbara Parker, Miss Blackpool 1964, who’s changed her name and abandoned her old life because she just wants to make people laugh, like her heroine Lucille Ball of I Love Lucy fame. Nick Hornby’s new novel is about popular culture, youth and old age, fame, class and teamwork. It offers a wonderfully captivating portrait of youthful exuberance and creativity, and of a period when both were suddenly allowed to flourish.”

Funny Girl: What I thought

I read this book for my face-to-face book group. I didn’t like the idea of the book, but I do like the writer, so okay, I was happy to try.

It turned out to be a really good story. Somehow, I never really engaged with Sophie/Barbara, the main character, although it could be argued that the show itself is the main character. I loved the feel of the 1960s and the story behind the (fictional) TV series.

Sophie is quite a handful and the show is built around her, a novice actress from Blackpool (of all places!). We follow the story of the writers, who are always living in fear of running out of ideas. Their discussions on what should be in each next episode are fun to read. The director, Dennis, is one of a kind and one can but hope he’ll be happy in the end.

The writing is very smooth and easy – not a book that you have to struggle to get through. Great fun to read, although I did find there wasn’t all that much to discuss with the book group about this book. Just read it for yourself, just for fun.


Rating: 5 out of 5 stars (okay)

Number of pages: 346

First published: 2014

I got this: bought in bookstore

Genre: Historical fiction

 

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

itsmonday“It’s Monday! What are you reading?” is a weekly event hosted by Sheila at Bookjourney to share with others what we’ve read the past week and are planning to read next.

*****

My reading week

dewittWeerwater by Renate DorresteinMan o man by Mascha de GroofThe Strange Library by Haruki MurakamiThe Shut Eye by Belinda Bauer

I finished reading Ablutions by Patrick DeWitt which I really enjoyed (4.5 stars). Very different from The Sisters Brothers! I’m currently reading a Dutch dystopian book, Weerwater [Water Fort] by Renate Dorrestein. She’s one of my favorite authors. I missed her book presentation because I was ill, so I bought the book as soon as I could. It’s great! I’m also reading Man o man [Man, Oh Man] by Mascha de Groof, another Dutch book, a nice, easy going chicklit.

Then next it’ll be The Strange Library by Haruki Murakami and The Shut Eye by Belinda Bauer. But that’s what I said last week, too! :-)

Our book group met on Friday and we discussed … everything but the book! It was fun, though. We did a book game were we all brought a book we liked and ended up with another book. I got (stole! That’s part of the game) Rules of Civility by Amor Towles. Yay!

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Reviews

Slaap zacht, Johnny Idaho by Auke Hulst

Just one review. Slaap zacht, Johnny Idaho [Sleep Tight, Johnny Idaho] by Auke Hulst – in Dutch. :-)

I have a small pile of to-be-reviewed books. It’s not as high as the to-be-read pile, but I must try harder at reviewing!

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My challenges

FitReaders2015

#Fitreaders is a challenge for all readers (and everyone else, really) who want to get more active. Last week, I did quite well. I had two days of 10,000 steps and two of 7,000. The other days I was ‘resting’.  My goal is 3 x 7,000  and 3 x 5,000 per week, and one day off. So, this is not bad.

Cut-Out-Processed-Food

The Cut out Processed Food in 14 Weeks challenge was easy last week (the sixth week of the challenge): Eat no light or diet food, including low-fat. That was a walk-through for me, as I don’t tend to eat food like that, except semi-skimmed milk and I’m not changing that, not even for this challenge. The coming week, we have to eat wholemeal everything. That’s OK, too, I think!

 

What are YOU reading this week?

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