The 24-Hour Read-a-thon! #readathon

april2017

It’s time to start the 24 Hour Read-a-thon! Many book bloggers and other book lovers all over the world will be reading as much as they can within 24 hours. Some will read 6 hours, some will try and read the full 24 hours.

Everyone starts at the same time, 12 GMT, which is 2 pm for me here in the Netherlands. I do need my sleep, but I will try and read for 16-18 hours. That is, I’ll be reading, checking other participants’ blog, tweet and Facebook about the event, eat dinner, breakfast, and lunch (in that order), sleep (for 6-8 hours), answer inquiries from potential clients (I run a book editing company), and go for a walk.

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This is what I’ll be reading:

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Two brand-new books: All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai and The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang. I also added a book to my TBR that I’ve been wanting to re-read for ages: The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty.

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Opening meme:

1) What fine part of the world are you reading from today? I’m from the Netherlands. I live in a small town near Utrecht.
2) Which book in your stack are you most looking forward to? I’m looking forward to all three books! 
3) Which snack are you most looking forward to? I bought some mango slices, and some cashew nuts with curry flavour. Yummy!
4) Tell us a little something about yourself! I’m a sort-of ex-blogger. I blogged a lot between 2010 and 2015 but lately, I haven’t had much time. I’m running a book (yes, book!) editing business which takes a lot of time. (Check out https://www.facebook.com/BookHelpline where we’re running a contest to win a year’s subscription to writing software.)
5) If you participated in the last read-a-thon, what’s one thing you’ll do different today? If this is your first read-a-thon, what are you most looking forward to? I’ve participated a lot of times already. This time I hope to be more active online. The last few readathons I spent most of the time … reading! 

After 6 hours:

I’m over 200 pages into All Our Wrong Todays and enjoying it a lot. I did the Show Me the Weather mini challenge. This is what it looks like here:

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After 10 hours

I almost finished All Our Wrong Todays (356 pages read) and it’s bedtime for me. I’ll be back around hour 18 for more reading!

After 18 hours

Back at reading. I finished my first book (see above) and am now reading The World vs the Wangs by Jade Chang.

After 24 hours

I read 280 pages of my second book, The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang. I’m going to read a bit more; it’s a fun book. I read a totla of 654 pages.

End-of-readathon survey

1. Which hour was most daunting for you? Around 11 at night (hour 9)
2. Could you list a few high-interest books that you think could keep a reader engaged for next year? Anything that’s not too long. Don’t get bogged down in a door stopper. 
3. Do you have any suggestions for how to improve the Read-a-thon next season? No.
4. What do you think worked really well in this year’s Read-a-thon? I liked the different ways people could take part (Facebook, Twitter, blog, IG, etc.).
5. How many books did you read? I read 1.5 books.
6. What were the names of the books you read? All Our Wrong Todays by Elan Mastai and The Wangs vs. the World by Jade Chang
7. Which book did you enjoy most? I liked them both. No preference.
8. Which did you enjoy least? 
9. How likely are you to participate in the Read-a-thon again?  11 on a scale from 1 to 10. I love the #readathon!

Do you participate? What are you reading?

Please leave a link to your starting post so I can easily find you.

November Update

Recently, I’ve been a bit quiet on this blog. I’m still reading quite a bit, but not blogging about it. I thought it’s time for a little update.

What I’ve been reading:

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The Sudden Disappearance of Hope by Claire North. Claire North’s protagonists all have some impossible characteristic which make the stories fantasy, while still touching on salient aspects of normal life. In this case, it’s Hope, a woman that people forget. After not having seen her for a few minutes, people don’t know that they’ve ever met her. The result is a lonely life for Hope.

Red Notice by Bill Browder. Non-fiction about the author’s adventures as an investment banker in Russia just after the collapse of the Berlin Wall. And about how things turn sour. He shows how the leading people in Russia are corrupter than ever and don’t mind a few dead bodies to cover up the worst of their actions. Not the sort of story I’m usually interested in but this was great reading!

The Mark and the Void by Paul Murray. I’ve only just started this book, but it seems good fun. About a French banker in Dublin who is being followed around by an author called Paul (!) who wants to write his story.

Last man in Tower by Aravind Adiga. I picked this book up almost exactly a year ago from a hotel book swap shelf in Paris, where I was on holiday with Suzanne. At first, the book was quirky and fun, but it lost its charm at around page 50. I read a bit more but gave up (for now) at page 90. It’s about an apartment building in Mumbai and its inhabitants (fun) and about a developer who wants to buy the building to take it down and build something more profitable (not so fun).

What I’ve been doing:

My book editing business, Book Helpline, is doing well. We’ve helped a lot of writers with their book and a few of them were published this month. We’re proud!

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The Secret Billionaire by Teymour Shahabi (YA novel)
The Black Raincoat by Brian Clarke (Short stories)
Week 42 by Emma McClane (Novel)
Behind the Glass by M. Van (Thriller)
A Bleat on a Bleak Winter’s Night by Rosie Button (children’s picture book)

And last, but not least, Book Helpline was chosen as one of the best book editors by Kindle Preneur! kindlepreneur

See you next month!

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The 24-Hour Read-a-thon! #readathon

readathonIt’s almost time to start the 24 Hour Read-a-thon! Many book bloggers and other book lovers all over the world will be reading as much as they can within 24 hours. Some will read 6 hours, some will try and read the full 24 hours.

Everyone starts at the same time, 12 GMT, which is 2pm for me here in the Netherlands. I do need my sleep, but I will try and read for 16-18 hours. That is, I’ll be reading, checking other participants’ blog, tweet and Facebook about the event, eat dinner, breakfast, and lunch (in that order), sleep (for 6-8 hours), tell my sons to get off the computer, answer inquiries from potential clients (I run a book editing company), and go for a walk.

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This is what I’ll be reading from:

books

Frank Derrick’s Holiday of A Lifetime by J.B. Morrison
The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald (finished)
The Secret Billionaire by Teymour Shahabi
Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert


Opening Meme

1) What fine part of the world are you reading from today? I’m reading from the Netherlands in Europe 
2) Which book in your stack are you most looking forward to? I’m especially looking forward to The Secret Billionaire. It’s written by one of our book editing clients, but I haven’t had the chance to read the final version in its entirety.
3) Which snack are you most looking forward to? I’ve got some honey-coated dry-roasted peanuts. I’m slightly “allergic” to honey (it gives me stomach aches) but a few handfulls should be fine.
4) Tell us a little something about yourself! Ask me why I call myself Leeswammes. No, I’m not Lee; I’m Judith!
5) If you participated in the last read-a-thon, what’s one thing you’ll do different today? More social media. I actually read quite a bit last time but it felt rather lonely.


After 6 hours, I finished the first book (phew!)

The Bookshop by Penelope Fitzgerald (177 pages). Nice, if sad, story about small-town England in the 1950s.


I finished three books in total

The additional two are:

Frank Derrick’s Holiday of A Lifetime by J.B. Morrison (304 pages)
The Secret Billionaire by Teymour Shahabi (385 pages)

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Do you participate? What are you reading?

Please leave a link to your starting post so I can easily find you.

Read: News of the World by Paulette Jiles

newsI received an e-copy of this book from the publisher for review.

I previously read Lighthouse Island by the same author, which I loved. That is a very different story. Whereas News of the World is set in the 19th century, Lighthouse Island is a dystopian novel set in a near future. I loved both novels equally. Jiles is a great writer who knows how to tell a good story.

A seventy-year-old man, Captain Kidd, a reader of news who travels around the country to earn a living, is asked to deliver a ten-year-old girl with her aunt and uncle, 400 miles away, after she had been stolen, and then rescued, from the indians. The girl, Johanna, feels indian, after having spent four years there, and will not comply to the rules of civilized society. Their journey is full of adventure and dangers.

The story is totally captivating. I enjoyed reading this so much! The slowly evolving relationship between the captain and Johanna is interesting to follow. We are told the story through the eyes of Captain Kidd and so we have no first-person knowledge of what is going on inside Johanna, but from the way she acts it becomes clear that she becomes attached to the old man. And the old man, who initially thought of her as a burden, becomes attached to her as well, and starts to doubt whether Johanna is really better off with her uncle and aunt.

A beautiful story about an old man and a young girl, traveling in a hostile world.

The publisher says: “It is 1870 and Captain Jefferson Kyle Kidd travels through northern Texas, giving live readings to paying audiences hungry for news of the world. An elderly widower who has lived through three wars and fought in two of them, the captain enjoys his rootless, solitary existence.

In Wichita Falls, he is offered a $50 gold piece to deliver a young orphan to her relatives in San Antonio. Four years earlier, a band of Kiowa raiders killed Johanna’s parents and sister; sparing the little girl, they raised her as one of their own. Recently rescued by the U.S. army, the ten-year-old has once again been torn away from the only home she knows.

Their 400-mile journey south through unsettled territory and unforgiving terrain proves difficult and at times dangerous. Johanna has forgotten the English language, tries to escape at every opportunity, throws away her shoes, and refuses to act “civilized.” Yet as the miles pass, the two lonely survivors tentatively begin to trust each other, forging a bond that marks the difference between life and death in this treacherous land.”

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